Bill C-71

What You Need to Know About Gun Control

Firearms in Canada are a leading cause of death. While recent focus has been on gang violence in large cities, gun violence is not just an urban issue. In fact, rates of crime and death per capita tend to be higher in smaller cities.

Guns do not cause homicides or suicides but they increase the likelihood that an assault will become a murder and that a suicide attempt will be fatal. Violence takes many forms and the type of firearms used vary, handguns are used most often in gang related violence, military assault weapons are often used in mass shootings, hunting rifles and shotguns are most often used in domestic homicides, suicides and killing of police officers.

All firearms need to be regulated. The regulation of firearms is important to reduce the risk that dangerous people will get access to guns. After stronger laws were introduced 1991 and 1995, the Conservative government relaxed the legislation and introduced gaping loopholes.

Bill C-71 Needs to be stronger not weaker.

The basics

Bill C-71 is new federal legislation that was introduced in March 2018 and is
currently before the Senate for final review. It includes some provisions that will
improve gun control in Canada.
It needs to be stronger not weaker.

Better screening
processes

GUN DEALERS KEEP RECORDS
OF ALL GUNS THEY SELL

RCMP DECIDES WHAT GUNS SHOULD BE CLASSIFIED AS
RESTRICTED OR PROHIBITED AND CAN RECLASSIFY & PROHIBIT SOME
FIREARMS CAPABLE OF AUTOMATIC FIRE

TRANSFER DATA FROM THE
GUN REGISTRY TO QUEBEC.

BILL C-71
IS NOT A REGISTRY

The Coalition’s Recommendations

With support from women’s groups, health care organizations, victims and others, we were able to get an amendment to strengthen the screening for firearm licenses. But we need more. Bill C-71 is currently before the Senate of Canada for review.

  • We need further amendments to make it easier for police to trace firearms by restoring provisions that were in place in 1977.

  • We need to restore controls over transporting handguns that were eliminated by the Conservatives.

Bill C-71 would require gun vendors to keep records of sales, a common-sense practice that had been in place since 1977. This part of the Firearms Act (1995) was removed when the centralized registry for rifles and shotguns was created, requiring individuals to obtain firearm registrations. When the registry was dismantled, and 6 million records were destroyed, this requirement was not restored. As a result, right now there is no information about who purchases rifles and shotguns in Canada and no way to trace them. The gun lobby says reintroducing the 1977 provisions is the same as the 1995 long gun registry. It is not.